Touring Spots of Discerning Travelers

There are historical buildings scattered throughout the ancient town of Wakura. Enjoy other charming aspects of Wakura, including a famous temple that was visited by the Imperial Family, and a spot where the springhead was before the legend of the white heron.

The Gobenden Building of Seirin-ji Temple

The Gobenden building was constructed in 1909 to welcome the Imperial Family to Wakura for the first time, and it was used as accommodation for Emperor Taisho and Emperor Showa. The Japanese-style room used as the bedroom was made to be particularly luxurious, and the very formal, coved and coffered ceiling is a sight to behold. In 1976, the buildings were split into the “honden (inner shrine)” and “benden (Emperor’s temporary palace)” and moved to be rebuilt at Seirin-ji Temple and Shingyo-ji Temple. They are open to visitors who wish to see them.

The Gobenden Building of Seirin-ji TempleThe Gobenden Building of Seirin-ji TempleThe Gobenden Building of Seirin-ji Temple

The Gobenden at Shingyo-ji Temple

The “benden,” which was separated from the “honden,” was moved and rebuilt at Shingyo-ji Temple. It was used mainly to accommodate chamberlains. The interior is immaculate, and a crisp atmosphere pervades the building. People are invited to immerse themselves in a moment of tranquility.

The Gobenden at Shingyo-ji TempleThe Gobenden at Shingyo-ji TempleThe Gobenden at Shingyo-ji Temple

A Storehouse Standing Quietly Near Seirin-ji Temple

A tasteful storehouse stands quietly by the single narrow path leading from the steps in front of Seirin-ji Temple. The roof can apparently be taken off when placing large objects inside, or taking them out. It is lit up by the orange street lamps in the evening giving it an even more charming appearance.

A Storehouse Standing Quietly Near Seirin-ji Temple

Sukunahikona-jinja Shrine

This is the guardian god of Wakura, deified in gratitude of a hot spring, which spouted out of the ground behind the shrine. The long, steep stone steps behind the shrine lead to Yu-no-Tani, the former springhead.

Sukunahikona-jinja ShrineSukunahikona-jinja ShrineSukunahikona-jinja Shrine

Yu-no-Tani

The history of Wakura Onsen began when a hot spring spouted out of the ground here between 806 and 810. However and earthquake, which struck between 1046 and 1053 resulted in crustal movement, moving the springhead offshore. Only a small shrine remains today.

Yu-no-TaniYu-no-Tani

The panels in Yumoto no Hiroba also show pictures of Yu-no-Tani. The panels show Wakura during different periods, allowing visitors to trace the changes that have taken place over time.

  • For more details go to “A pictorial history of Wakura”!

LANGUAGE»Japanese|English

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